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Why you shouldn’t drive while tired

On Behalf of | Aug 27, 2021 | Personal Injury |

According to those who have studied the issue, driving on a Florida highway while tired can be just as dangerous as doing so while drunk. Studies have shown that operating a motor vehicle after staying awake for 24 straight hours is similar to driving with a blood-alcohol level of .10. The legal blood alcohol limit in the state is .08.

You might not be able to stay awake

One of the key dangers of driving while tired is the fact that you’re at risk of falling asleep behind the wheel. It’s also possible that you’ll experience microsleep, which is when your eyes stay closed for up to 10 seconds at a time. If you fall asleep for any period of time, it will be impossible to maintain your lane or avoid objects that cross your path.

You may not be able to remember where you are

Driving while drowsy can also be dangerous because you may experience a lack of spatial awareness. In other words, you may not know where you are in relation to other cars, landmarks, or pedestrian crossings. It may also be difficult to process information in a timely manner, which may increase your risk of causing an accident at an intersection controlled by a stop sign or red light. If you are hurt in a wreck caused by a drowsy motorist, you may want to file a personal injury claim.

A motor vehicle accident can cause significant injuries that you may not fully recover from. Furthermore, you may experience property damage that could cost thousands of dollars to repair. However, if you can prove that a crash was caused by another driver’s negligence, it may be possible to be compensated for any losses that you incurred.

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