Tampa Law Blog

Do adult children have a "right" to inherit in Florida?

In our estate planning practice, clients often ask whether their adult children have a "right" to inherit in Florida. [this discussion is not addressing minor children--their rights can be different]. While the question is a simple one, the answer is somewhat of a "mixed bag." As with many legal questions, the answer is "it depends."

Summary Administration in Florida

In Florida, there are two types of probate administration: formal and summary. Both accomplish essentially the same objective of allowing the distribution of a decedent's assets. However, there are some significant differences between these two types of probate. This article is intended to discuss the summary probate administration.

Remember to watch out for trip-and-fall hazards on Halloween

Like most Florida children, your kids likely want to get out and about for Halloween. You may somewhat dread the holiday because it can be hectic to get the kids the costumes they want, actually get them into the costumes when the day comes, and keep them from fighting over candy or other issues as you take them house to house for treats.

Of course, as stressful as you might find Halloween, you may still look forward to seeing the joy on your children's faces as the excitement for the holiday builds. Though you may worry about the amount of candy they will eat and the stomach aches that could follow, you also need to think about other hazards of going onto other people's property, such as dangerous conditions.

Florida's Spousal Elective Share and Life Insurance

Under Florida law, a spouse has the right to receive 30% of certain of his or her deceased spouse's assets. This is true notwithstanding whether the deceased spouse has excluded his or her spouse under his or her Last Will and Testament or Trust. So if the deceased spouse died having a Will which left nothing to his or her spouse, then the surviving spouse could still receive 30% of the applicable assets. The surviving spouse would have to make an election under Section 732.201, Fla. Stat. in order to be entitled to receive this share.

In Florida probate, when is homestead property not given homestead protection?

Article X, Section 4 of the Constitution of Florida provides protection against the claims of creditors for a person's homestead, i.e. their principal residence. In essence, if a homeowner owes money to a creditor, that creditor cannot attach or force sale of the residence in order to receive payment. The same concept applies if the owner dies owning a homestead. In other words, if a homeowner owes a creditor (such as a credit card, medical bills, etc.), when the person dies, the creditor usually cannot collect against the homestead. The homestead is exempt form the claims of creditors.

The Do-it-Yourself Disaster!

In today's era of on-line forms, office supply stores, and software, it is becoming increasingly more common for people to try to prepare their own estate planning documents. Whether it is a simple Durable Power of Attorney, a Living Will, a Last Will and Testament, or a Trust, there are plenty of ways that people can try to create their own estate documents. In our practice, we often see this result in an outright DISASTER!

Why Probate is Needed to Pursue a Florida Wrongful Death Claim

In Florida, when the death of a person is caused by the wrongful act, negligence, default, or breach of contract or warranty of any person, certain of the deceased's survivors and the deceased's estate may be entitled to recover damages. Those damages, and who are entitled to them, are set forth in detail in Section 768.21, Fla. Stat.

Does my Will control who receives my life insurance benefits at my death?

Clients sometimes ask this question--often because they are confused about the relationship between their Will and their life insurance policy. After all, doesn't the Will designate a person's beneficiaries? This blog will clarify the relationship between the Will and life insurance.

Vetting your potential business partner

Finding a business partner who complements your personality, feeds your creativity and appreciates your goals is not easy. If you have found someone you think will work well with you, congratulations. However, it is still wise to proceed with caution before you sign contracts and commit to a partnership.

Whether you have known your potential partner for years or you just met at a business conference, you may not know the factors that affect the success or failure of a business. As difficult and awkward as it may be, you will want to learn as much as you can about your partnership candidate, and this may mean looking under every stone.

Medicaid Claim Against A Deceased Person's Estate

A common question which we encounter in our Florida estate and probate practice is whether a person's estate will owe any money to Medicaid upon the person's death. Usually the reason for their question is that the person has received Medicaid benefits prior to their death. Many times, those benefits were as a result of Medicaid paying for the deceased person's long term care in their final years.

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